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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
human beings. so they look for the devil and look among the deities, a very complex religion. very elaborate, very well structured, and they looked among the deities, and they found be issue, the deity called issue. who's issue? i often refer to issue as the imminent -- [inaudible] of the human condition. why do i call him that? issue is an unpredictable spirit. issue exists to teach humanity, but there's always more than one side to an issue. more than one face to any reality. teaches you beware of appearances. the best laid plans of mice and men, etc., issue is the embodiment of the lesson gained by such things. and when you teach humanity about the folly in -- [inaudible] or being dogmatic about any issue, it tends to do it in a rather painful way, you know, hike a good teacher armed with a cane, symbolic cane for adults who haven't learned the wisdom of looking at both sides of a question. and his places are the crossroads where, of course, which is the place where human beings get confused. which road do you take at a crossroads? issue's so mischievous that in the overall pant
, for example, on a base and there are multiple religions who want to use that chapel or sacred space then there should be no permanent religious symbol on the extearer or interor because it's used by others. and i would say not because i would like everyone to have lots of different views and-- but no, it's to protect the constitution, which is the government should not establish one religion over another, in this case, i think it's a good thing. if there are many different religious beliefs represented they should not establish one over the other. >> ainsley: what building is this? isn't it a chapel? >> they could use that sacred space for different groups. if you have a cross outside of the chapel used by many different religious groups, including jewish and muslim then you're saying this is just for christians. >> is the answer not to remove the cross, to have the inclusion of all religious symbols there, how difficult would that be. >> the policy is that there's no permanent symbols and then once the religious service is going on, put up crosses, crucifixes, whatever religious sy
sense is that regardless of culture, race religion try some commonality. these essential human truth compassion and hope some moral precepts are universal. just go and somebody is another variation he said in the speech that made famous in the 2004 keynote address at the democratic national convention in boston, where he said there's a red states blue states, but the united states. he presented himself as the personification of that notion. his presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far you can take that. so he has been dealing with that. the promise and frustrations of that idea ever sense. as i'm sure we'll both be experiencing the telephone calls, for the show. >> host: your book ends in 1989, "barack obama: the story." he said there's another volume coming? >> guest: added y2k committed to 40 years of robert caro, so assertive cat that on the down low, but i had every intention and i've done a lot of reporting that the later years, which influences the book even though they're not in it. and i don't want to do a quickie. i tried a rate for history documents coming o
. it was the first time discrimination had ever been used in the distinction between race, religion, etc., discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, by giving it a fame it started -- a name it started to have it own life. the ability of a president to name something, i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress and was from day one in this country the president at the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these terms which are sort of created by presidents we think are, um, they are from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term "first lady." he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin ha
to the lds church and what challenges it poses when they are picking a college. we knew his religion was extremely important to him. he seemed like a very nice guy, like a very thoughtful guy. that continued through college and i followed this story as well and was at the heisman ceremony when he was talking about this stuff when apparently he had already been told it was a hoax. it's just really weird and raises a lot of questions. >> manti te'o, gail, released some of the voice mails that he said came from this person that he believed to be lennay, the girlfriend online. let me play a clip. >> hi, i'm just telling you know i got here and i'm getting ready for my first session and just want to call you to keep you posted. i miss you. i love you. bye. babe, i'm just calling to say good night. i love you. i know that you're probably doing homework or you're with the boys or i want to say i love you and good night. i'll be okay tonight. i'll do my best. yeah. so get your rest and i'll talk to you tomorrow. i love you so much, hun. sweet dreams. i don't know who answered your phone and
of religion. and so we have this enormous, tragic history that all of us confront from whatever our backgrounds are whether we're white, black, hispanic, asian, whether we're muslim, jew or christian. the notion that, in fact, in the words of a great writer who happened to win a nobel prize, william faulkner, he said the past is never dead and buried, it isn't even past. and i think that all of us are confronting constantly our history. we're confronting the history of slavery in this country. we're confronting the history and problems that arose as a consequence of colonialism. we're confronting those scars of violence and oppression and struggle and difficulty and hope not only on the larger canvas of history, but also within our own families. and for me it was not entirely obvious how, in fact, i was going to be able to integrate and pull together all those different strands in my life. so part of my challenge growing up was to figure out how do i function as someone who is black but also has white blood in me, how do i function as somebody who with is american and takes pride an
. it is an exploitation and hijacking of an old and honored religion. we need to find a way -- this is something we have to work at -- for people to understand the degree to which that is happening and becoming an excuse for their disenfranchisement. for being deprived of good governance, good economy, jobs, opportunity. one of our missions is to not let that be an excuse. carrying the banner of religious tolerance, diversity is critical. we have raised that with resident morsi -- president .orsi we talked about the need for the brotherhood to be able to respect the diversity of egypt. that has not happened completely as much as we would like in the constitutional process. we need to work together to try to do it. you raised a central issue with respect to what is happenioticss in the world. it has to be front and center in our dialogue. >> thank you. mr. chairman, all of us who have known you thought that you had for president yourself well. you will be confirmed in the next few days. i thank you for your -- for the fact that you want to serve in this position and that you have developed in extensive a
security and they're worried that the iranian authorities are rather than talking religion, talking about political issues. and that makes it all that much more serious. bill: what is the situation for christians in iran, for them, amy? >> reporter: well, you know, bill, there are 300,000 christians in iran. many are armenian and assyrian. but it is evangelicals the converts who are under the most scrutiny. they have this network what they call house churches. increasingly according to sources here those networks are being infiltrated. and those are the christians who really are in trouble these days. they are being cracked down on. it is estimated hundreds of them are in jail. you may remember, the case of youcef nard nard, who was in jail for several years recently released. the his situation is tenuous. several journalists were arrested over the weekend believed to be an act of intimidation before the national elections in the country. bill: thank you, amy. we'll speak with the pastor's wife. her first television interview since her husband was sentenced. we'll get an interview with th
but to invent your own religion you're own spirituality. ♪ you got to help me to take a stand ♪ >> if i say "fire and rain," what's the first thought you have? >> i remember where i was when i wrote the tune. >> where were you? >> whether it first occurred to me. i was in a basement flat in london in the west end. ♪ oh i seen fire and i seen rain ♪ >> and the song just came to me. and then -- >> just came to me? >> uh-huh. i mean you know, songs were -- that was happening frequently to me at that point. and -- >> why was that at that point this was happening to you? >> well, i had a lot of empty time. i had a lot of energy. i had a lot of yearning a lot of unsolved senses of -- i very much wanted to express myself and define myself. >> was that the most fertile period for you ever? >> yeah, yeah it was. i was really busting at the seams to express myself. ♪ i'm going to carolina in my mind ♪ >> where did that song come from? >> i was homesick. i was in london and i was -- i was just thinking about north carolina. i was so -- >> does it just flow once you got on to
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)